Wilderness of the Mind

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Hello friends, I hope you are all coping with the Covid-19 restrictions and that this message finds you well. I have three new works exhibiting online with the Wilderness Art Collective as our summer group show has had to move online due to social distancing. A residency making inks from seaweed in Mull, Scotland, workshops and a residency with the WAC, and many courses and classes I was leading have been postponed. But I will shortly be filming many of my classes with a great young film-maker, and along with online seminars, will be offering distance learning in the not too distant future. Keep an eye on my Instagram for the latest news on that. I also have three specially commissioned pieces in the next Dark Mountain fiction book. Rather than being illustrations, the writer has taken my works as the starting point, and will write outwards from there. This is an approach I have taught at Wild Twins Course over the years. It makes a nice change for the image to be first, before the words.

Unlike most people, I don’t yet run an email newsletter. In the autumn I will start one, so that folks can easily sign up to classes. I don’t like to bother folks, goodness knows how our inboxes are already clogged. But I promise to only make them 4-5 times a year. For now, have a great summer.

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‘Stalked’, iron gall ink on handmade buckskin, mounted on board. May 2020.

This was drawn with a moulted goose quill feather pen, the ink was made from local oakgalls, rain water and discarded iron, the buckskin is from waste hides which I transform into parchment, buckskin and leather. The work features in the WAC exhibition and in the next Dark Mountain book.

Interview with GroundBright

workshops

The interview I gave last December is now online to read here. In it I speak a bit about my path and inclinations in art and nature.

Classes continue at my studio, yesterday was painting on buckskin. In February we have an introduction to making natural watercolours. Get in touch if you would like to come along on 9th.

On the left, a finished ink gall ink on buckskin patch. On the right, watercolour making with Clearwell Caves red ochre, cherry tree gum and honey, glycerine or agave syrup.

Found and ground

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It is a joy to find what we need on the ground beneath our feet. ‘Making good use of the things that we find, things that the everyday folks leave behind…’ British folks who were kids in the 1970’s will remember the Wombles, wonderful resourceful animated characters who lived in Wimbledon Common and were proto up-cyclers, foragers and green champions. The show should be brought back, it would be so on-trend.

I’ve been finding some great materials this year, here’s a few pictures.

IMG_2500Red Devon clay, as I found it on a rainy day it formed these useful lumps.

foraged materials basket

Starting my wild basket in the woods with a ‘god’s eye’ of split hazel withies, followed with long strands of ivy.

Here’s my latest improv basket, made in the woods of Wiltshire. It’s just the right size for gathering nuts and berries, roots and leaves, which is what I was living on for four days. More about that later!

 

Wild Twins head home

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Thanks to all who came and made this course so great. There’ll be much more on this website soon, but for now here’s a few pictures. Paul’s Wyrd School is launched, and Wild Twins was everything we’d hoped for and more, as the folks who attended brought so much expertise, enthusiasm and openness. Paul brought his wild writing, and I brought a very large bag of rocks and feathers… and we worked all week in a light-filled room 12 feet from the edge of the ocean, pulling apart our old notions, listening to the land and water speak, watching the sea otters watch us back, and responding freshly with our materials of earth.